Dallas County joins global partnership fighting to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins and other local representatives at the signing of the Paris Declaration on Aug. 26, 2019, a declaration that formalized Dallas County’s commitment to ending HIV/AIDS and launched the Dallas Fast-Track County initiative.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins and other local mayors signed the Paris Declaration on Aug. 26, 2019, which formalized Dallas County’s commitment to ending HIV/AIDS and launched the Dallas Fast-Track County initiative. Dallas County’s participation in the growing network of US counties part of the Fast-Track Cities initiative, a global partnership between over 300 cities and municipalities around the world to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic, focuses on specific goals.

By 2030, Dallas County hopes to achieve:

  1. 90% of all people living with HIV will know their HIV status; 
  2. 90% of all people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive sustained antiretroviral therapy; 
  3. 90% of all people receiving antiretroviral therapy will have viral suppression;
  4. 90% reduction in new HIV infections;
  5. End the stigma related to HIV.

“Dallas County has the right people, the experience and the passion to accomplish these goals if we work together as a community,” said Dallas County Health and Human Services Director, Dr. Philip Huang. “This Fast-Track County effort will also help Dallas County operationalize the state Achieving Together and the federal Ending the Epidemic plans.”  

The Health and Human Services department hopes Texas will become a state in which HIV is rare and every person has access to high-quality prevention, care and treatment regardless of age, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity or socio-economic status.